Total hip replacement

Total hip replacement

On fig. 1 it is shown X-ray of the hip of one of our lady patients before operation suffering from severe osteoarthritis. It is visible severe destruction of cartilage so there is contact of bone to bone, with severe pain day and night pain and with progressive limitation of hip range of motion. She could not be able to perform many phyisological functions. On picture 2 it is shown her X-ray after accurate performed total hip replacement using cementless endoprosthesis. She immediately lost a pain and started to walk with full weight bearing the day after the operation and has fully recovered one month later, being able to walk longer distance. Again, after rehabilitation she received a full range of motion in the hip and has been very happy to perform all normal life activities.
For total hip replacement we use cementless, cemented, hybrid and special total hip prostheses as for patients with Developmental Dislocation (Displasia) of the Hip (DDH). Prof. Mitkovic personally performed about one thousand hip replacement.

Total Hip Replacement in Developmental Dislocation of the Hip

Figure 1 shows the X-ray of lady patient who had Developmental Dislocation of the Hip. It can be seen that the right hip is normal while left hip is dislocated and not developed as well as left part of pelvis. The patient had a 4 cm shorter legs, had pain when walking and range of motion was limited. Despite of shoes with 3 cm heel, she visibly limped. In Figure 2 it is shown the femoral component of an femoral component of the hip that prof. Mitković designed for the purpose of treating such patients. Figure 3 shows the X-ray where can be seen precisely built an hip endoprothesis shown in figure 2. The picture shows that the operation created a new cup hook (which never existed) with bone that is taken from a deformed femoral head, that otherwise removed. The bone is fixed to the pelvis by means of screw that can be seen above the implant. After the operation, the pain disappeared. The patient was two months walking with crutches until the bone is healed. Now, 19 years after the surgery, patients walk normally without crutches. No pain and no limp and a range of motion is normal.